Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is an innovative award-winning non-profit journalism organization dedicated to supporting in-depth engagement with underreported global affairs through our sponsorship of quality international journalism across all media platforms and a unique program of outreach and education to schools and universities.

The Pulitzer Center endeavors to connect students with pressing, underreported global issues and the journalists that cover them throughout the school year and summer by collaborating with teachers to schedule classroom visits, journalism workshops and professional development sessions. Sign up for the Pulitzer Center education listserv to begin receiving weekly updates and lessons connected to global reporting. You will also be added to the list of teachers contacted when journalists are available for classroom visits.

If you would like support designing a project connected to Pulitzer Center reporting, contact Senior Education Manager Fareed Mostoufi at fmostoufi@pulitzercenter.org

ARTS AND HUMANITIES FOR EVERY STUDENT

EVERYDAY DC: A PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT EXAMINING REPRESENTATION OF DC (March Lottery) 
Program Description: What images come to mind when you think of Washington, D.C.? How does media representation of the District compare with the everyday experiences of youth in the DC? Students will explore these questions as part of an interactive workshop at the Everyday DC exhibition now on view at the Southwest Arts Club. The exhibition features over one hundred images taken by students from seven DC public middle schools who participated in the Everyday DC unit this fall. Inspired by Everyday Africa, an Instagram feed aimed at countering negative media coverage of the continent, the unit asked students to make positive contributions to media representation of DC by applying photography and reporting skills to visualizing their everyday realities of the District. This field trip will introduce students to the exhibition, teach strategies for analyzing photography, explore curation and photography composition skills and ultimately lead to a final project that asks students to reflect on how they would visualize their everyday realities in DC. 
Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Time(s): 10:00 AM and 12:30PM
Program Length: 2 hours
Location: Southwest Arts Club, 700 Delaware Avenue Southwest, Washington, DC 20024
Note: Site is a 10 minute walk from the Waterfront metro station
Discipline: Humanities, Social Studies, History, Photography
Curriculum Connections: History, Urban Studies, Diversity 
Appropriate Grade Level(s): Grades 4-12

for Everyday DC: A Photography Project Examining Representation of DC

WALK LIKE A JOURNALIST: A REPORTING PROJECT INSPIRED BY PAUL SALOPEK’S JOURNEY ON FOOT AROUND THE WORLD (DEEPER ENGAGEMENT) (March Lottery)
Presented by: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
What do you learn about a place, and ultimately about the world, by slowing down to a walking pace? Students will explore this question through the eyes of National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek, a journalist who embarked on a reporting mission in early 2013 to walk the same 21,000 mile path that modern humans took from Africa to South America over the course of roughly 50,000 years. Over a series of three workshops, students will analyze Salopek’s project to explore what a “slow approach” to journalism reveals about the world. Students will also meet with a professional photojournalist to learn observation and communication skills that they will then apply their own slow-reporting project right here in D.C.
Dates: TBD/Flexible, Based upon School Availability
Time: TBD/Flexible
Length of Event: Day 1 (in school) 2.5 hrs, Day 2 (trip) 3:90 minutes, Day 3 (in school): 2.5 hrs
Location: In-School and at the Pulitzer Center office
1779 Massachusetts Ave, Suite 615 Washington, DC 20036 Discipline: Humanities, Visual Arts/Photography/Film
Curriculum Connections: Language Arts, Philosophy, Technology, Media/Film, History & Geography, Civics/Law, Diversity, Science
Grades: 4-12
Maximum Ticket Capacity: 45 students
Curriculum Materials

This event has  pre- and post-trip visits along with a field-trip to the Pulitzer Center.

for WALK LIKE A JOURNALIST: A REPORTING PROJECT INSPIRED BY PAUL SALOPEK’S JOURNEY ON FOOT AROUND THE WORLD


Previous Events

THE EMPATHY GAP: USING PHOTOJOURNALISM TO EXPLORE IDENTITY 
Presented by: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
How do you form questions that elicit stories? How do you capture the information from an interview with a picture? How is identity influenced by history and culture? Students will explore these questions as part of a reporting and photography project at inspired by photojournalist Daniella Zalcman’s Signs for Your Identity project. Zalcman interviewed survivors of government-mandated residential schools for indigenous children in the U.S. and Canada and then created double-exposure portraits with her iPhone that blended an image of the interview subject with an image of a place/object that reflects information from the subject’s past. Students will meet with Zalcman to learn about her reporting, and then will experience her reporting and photography process. They will start by practicing questioning and listening skills, and then will apply those skills by conducting an interview with another student. They will use that information to create double-exposure portraits reflecting what they learned from the person they interviewed. Ideally, at least two schools will sign up for this session, allowing students to conduct interviews with students from another class. Note: It is preferred that students bring phones/cameras with them to take photos, but Pulitzer Center will have digital cameras available for students to use in small groups.
Date: 1/18/16
Time: 10:00 AM
Length of Event: 2.5 hours
Location: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting 1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 615 Washington, DC 20036
Discipline: Humanities, Media/Film Curriculum Connections: English/Language Arts, Architecture/Urban Studies, Technology, History/Geography, Civics/Law, Diversity 
Grades: 6th-12th

THE EMPATHY GAP was available in the December Lottery

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

THE ART OF GLOBAL JOURNALISM: EXPLORING GLOBAL ISSUES THROUGH ART
Presented by: The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting 
Internal conflict. Global health. Conflict environmental sustainability. How do these global issues connect to local contexts? How can art help students process these important topics in ways that will both engage them and connect them to the larger world? Where is the intersection of art and journalism? This professional development workshop brings together award-winning journalists supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and digital and educational resources created by the Pulitzer Center to address the incorporation of current global issues in the classroom. The program will include a combination of presentations and hands-on curriculum building activities. Participants will leave with tools to incorporate new content into their classes, as well as connections to journalists working on these issues.
Date: 12/8/2016, 2/22/17 
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Length of Event: 2.5
Location: The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW #615 Washington, DC 20036
Curriculum Connections: English/Language Arts, Philosophy. Technology, Foreign Language, Math, History and Geography, Civics/Law, Diversity, Science
Grades: Teachers of Grades 3–12

THE EMPATHY GAP: USING PHOTOJOURNALISM TO EXPLORE IDENTITY
Presented by: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
How do you form questions that elicit stories? How do you capture the information from an interview with a picture? How is identity influenced by history and culture? Educators will explore these questions, while also engaging with reporting and photography skills, as part of a workshop inspired by photojournalist Daniella Zalcman’s Signs for Your Identity project. Zalcman interviewed survivors of government-mandated residential schools for indigenous children in the U.S. and Canada and then created double-exposure portraits with her Iphone that blended an image of the interview subject with an image of a place/object that reflects information from the subject’s past. Educators will meet with Zalcman to learn about her reporting, and then will experience her reporting and photography process. They will start by practicing questioning and listening skills, and then will apply those skills by conducting an interview with another workshop participant. They will use that information to create double-exposure portraits reflecting what they learned from the person they interviewed. This session will also feature an introduction to Pulitzer Center’s free educational resources and programming. Refreshments will also be provided.
Date: 1/18/16
Time: 4:30-7:00 PM
Length of Event: 2.5 hours
Location: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting 1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Suite 615 Washington, DC 20036
Discipline: Humanities, Media/Film Curriculum Connections: English/Language Arts, Architecture/Urban Studies, Technology, History/Geography, Civics/Law, Diversity 
Grades: 6th-12th

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Contact

Mailing: 975 F Street, NW
Location: 923 F Street, NW, #303
Washington, DC 20004
P: 202.470.6467
info@dccollaborative.org

The DC Collaborative is a FY17 partner grant recipient of the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

The DC Collaborative is proud to receive a grant for its Collective Impact work supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.