President Lincoln's Cottage

The mission of President Lincoln's Cottage is to bring the world to “the cradle of the Emancipation Proclamation,” and connect with Lincoln through his untold stories. View more information on their Member Feature Page
 

 


Winter Programs

Asterisk (*) indicates synchronous engagement available.

Idea Portraits with President Lincoln's Cottage *
While in residence at the Cottage, Lincoln developed some of his most nation-changing ideas, including the Emancipation Proclamation. In this activity, inspired by Lincoln’s use of the Cottage as a place to develop big ideas, students create self-portraits to document their own idea-generation process and the ideas floating around in their heads.
Content Areas: English/Literature, Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Arts, Social and Emotional Learning
Discipline: Historic Site Visit, Visual Arts
Resource Type: Online or Printable Lesson Plan/ Study Guide
Learning Standards: This activity supports Common Core standards around students explaining their ideas in light of a discussion, as well as CASEL's social-emotional learning standards around self-awareness and social awareness. It also supports DCPS Visual Arts standards around expression through original works of art, including collage, drawing shapes, and creating self-portraits. "
Grades: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th
Length: 60 minutes
This program/resource is accommodating of students with learning/developmental disabilities.

"One National Family" - Family Trees with President Lincoln's Cottage *
President Lincoln and his family sought sanctuary at the Cottage in the summers of 1862, 1863, and 1864 amidst the turbulence of the Civil War and personal tragedy. The Cottage afforded the Lincoln family some much-needed quiet and gave the president an opportunity for reflection as he thought through big questions facing the nation. Using an illustration of the Osage orange tree that grows adjacent to the Cottage, students create a family tree that celebrates the many people, values, and qualities that make up their own family, and the larger American "national family."
Content Areas: Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Civics/Government, Social and Emotional Learning
Discipline: Writing/Reading/Journalism, Historic Site Visit
Resource Type: Other Interactive Distance Learning Activity/ Online or Printable Resource
Learning Standards: This activity supports Common Core standards around visual presentation of ideas, as well as CASEL's social-emotional learning standards around self-awareness and social awareness. It also supports DCPS Social Studies standards for lower grades around understanding one's place within and power within the larger community, and for middle school around civic systems of the United States.
Grades: K, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th
Length: 45 minutes
This program/resource is accommodating of students with learning/developmental disabilities.​​​​​​​

Tell Your Immigration Story *
Lincoln recognized as immigrants as one of America’s greatest resources, and believed in America’s founding promises offering them a chance to succeed. On July 4, 1864, the day his family moved out to the Cottage for the last time, Lincoln signed into law An Act to Encourage Immigration. Inspired by Lincoln's work, in this activity, students research and trace their family’s immigration journey to the United States and reflect on what it means to be American. 
Content Areas: English/Literature, Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Civics/Government
Discipline: Writing/Reading/Journalism, Historic Site Visit
Resource Type: Online or Printable Lesson Plan/ Study Guide
Learning Standards: This activity supports Common Core standards around research, writing clear narratives with well-structured sequences of events, and producing clear and coherent writing. It also supports DCPS Social Studies standards around the history of immigration in the United States, particularly for grades 5, 11, and 12.
Grades: 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th
Length: 45 minutes

President Lincoln's Cottage: A Retreat
Created with the National Park Service’s Teaching With Historic Places project, this online lesson covers the environment of wartime Washington, DC, what sanctuary means, and why Lincoln might have sought one out amid the pressures of his Civil War presidency. Students examine historic images, maps, and texts to gain insight into Lincoln's work while in residence at the Cottage.
Content Areas: Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Civics/Government
Discipline: Writing/Reading/Journalism, Artifact or Object Exploration
Resource Type: Online or Printable Lesson Plan/ Study Guide
Learning Standards: This activity supports Common Core standards around analysis of informational texts, and comparing/contrasting primary sources around the same topic or event. It also supports DCPS Social Studies standards around the Civil War and its impact on Washington, DC, particularly for grades 8, 11, and 12.
Grades: 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th
​​​​​​​Length: 90 minutes


Previous Lotteries

Fall Lottery

The Open Field Project
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage

While living at the Cottage, Lincoln wrestled with the challenges of his Presidency– including the development of the Emancipation Proclamation. The Open Field Project provides inspiration for students to reflect on their own civic priorities and take action on issues that are important to them. In this virtual program, students bring Lincoln’s work into their learning spaces and plant an idea garden with their seeds of their own ideas. Guided by a museum facilitator and using their fully-stocked idea garden kit – sent in advance of the program –students learn about Lincoln’s thought process and record their own bold ideas on seed paper, plant them in soil from the Cottage’s own grounds, and watch them grow.
Date: TBD
Time: 10 AM and 1 PM
Length of Event: 45 minutes 
Location: Virtual
Content Area: Social Studies/History
Medium: Virtual Field Trip; Historic Site Visit; Hands-On/Lab
Learning Standards
Grades: 3rd - 12th, Adult/Alternative Education
Ticket capacity: Each program session comes with 1 kit for up to 30 students. If multiple classes would like to participate, they can plan a second program time and will need a second kit.
Supplementary Materials: TBD
Ticket Cost: $4

 

Seventh Street Challenge
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage
Lincoln used his daily commute through the heart of Civil War Washington as an opportunity to reflect on the challenges of his presidency and to learn from those he encountered along the way. In the Seventh Street Challenge, students trace Lincoln’s route from the White House, up the 7th Street Turnpike, and home to the Cottage – participating in scavenger-hunt-style challenges to find thematic objects within their own homes as they go – and build their own capacity for meaningful daily problem-solving.
Date: TBD
Time: 10 AM and 1 PM
Length of Event: 45 minutes
Location: Virtual
Content Area: Social Studies/History
Medium:  Virtual Field Trip; Historic Site Visit; Hands-On/Lab
Learning Standards
Grades: 3rd-8th
Supplementary Materials: TBD
Ticket Cost: $1

 

Virtual Lincoln's Toughest Decisions
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage
Abraham Lincoln’s presidency was marked by the development of big ideas and nation-changing actions. A key element of Lincoln’s collaborative process was to consult the ideas of those around him while leading the country through turmoil toward a new birth of freedom. Lincoln’s approach provides a model for students to develop their own decision-making skills as they strive to understand the value of conflicting ideas, building support to achieve positive change in modern society, and their own responsibility and power within their communities. In the adapted virtual version of Lincoln’s Toughest Decisions: Debating Emancipation—an award-winning program that exposes students to the different perspectives of President Lincoln’s adversaries, allies, and friends— students work in small groups to explore historical documents and recreate the heated discussions that President Lincoln had over emancipation.
Date: TBD
Time: 10 AM and 1 PM
Length of Event: 2 hours
Location: Virtual
Content Area: Social Studies/History
Medium:  Virtual Field Trip; Historic Site Visit; Hands-On/Lab
Learning Standards
Grades: 8th - 12th, Adult/Alternative Education
Ticket capacity: Not possible to run the program with fewer than 10 students
Supplementary Materials: TBD
Ticket Cost: $1

 

From Abe-to-Z: A Q&A with President Lincoln’s Cottage Staff
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage
Students will connect with staff from the education department at President Lincoln’s Cottage via videoconference to learn more about the place where Abraham Lincoln spent a quarter of his presidency and developed the Emancipation Proclamation and have their questions answered about the nation’s 16th President, the Cottage itself, and Lincoln’s brave ideas.
Date: TBD
Time: 10 AM and 1 PM
Length of Event: 30 minutes
Location: Virtual
Content Area: Social Studies/History
Medium:  Virtual Field Trip; Historic Site Visit
Learning Standards
Grades: K - 12th

Spring Lottery

Lincoln's Toughest Decisions
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage
Abraham Lincoln solved the difficult problems of his time by consulting the ideas of those around him, thus informing his own thought process. This approach serves as a model for students to develop their own decision-making skills as they strive to understand the power of their ideas in modern society. In Lincoln’s Toughest Decisions: Debating Emancipation — an award-winning program that puts students in the role of historical people with a stake in the decision on emancipation — students use touch screen monitors to explore historical documents and recreate the heated discussions that President Lincoln and others had over emancipation.
Date: 5/18/20
Time: 10:00 AM
Location:  President Lincoln's Cottage, 3700 North Capitol St NW #558, Washington DC 20011
Length of Program: 90 minutes
Content: Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Civics/Government, Diversity
Grades: 6th-12th
Capacity: 45
Supplementary Materials

Lincoln's Hat
Presented by: President Lincoln's Cottage
As a young man, Abraham Lincoln began forming ideas on issues of justice and freedom. As he grew, so too did his ideas. While living at his Cottage, President Lincoln thought through his ideas on the Civil War and emancipation, and turned these ideas into action. In Lincoln’s Hat, Lincoln’s unique note-taking practice serves as a model to students as they develop their own creative ideas and problem solving skills on everyday decisions and complex issues. Students will discover President Lincoln’s unique habit of storing his ideas inside his signature stovepipe hat, and a hands-on activity provides students a special place to keep their own ideas.
Date: 5/4/20, 6/3/20, 6/9/20
Time: 10:00 AM
Location:  President Lincoln's Cottage, 3700 North Capitol St NW #558, Washington DC 20011
Length of Program: 90 minutes
Content: Social Studies/ History/ Geography, Civics/Government, Diversity
Grades: K-3rd
Capacity: 45
Supplementary Materials

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Mailing: 975 F Street, NW
Location: 923 F Street, NW, #303
Washington, DC 20004
P: 202.470.6467
info@dccollaborative.org

The DC Collaborative is a FY19 Service Organization grant recipient of the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

The DC Collaborative is proud to receive a grant for its Collective Impact work supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.